What we got wrong building our Tableau service


Hi

I spend a lot of time talking to other companies about how to put together a decent Tableau Centre of Excellence. And that’s cool. I love to help people and I also learn a ton from all the other great setups out there.

But that also gets me thinking. We are far from perfect. And we made a whole lot of mistakes on the way to building our service. So instead of talking about the good stuff we did, I thought I’d highlight what I think we got wrong.

So in no particular order of importance, here are our top mistakes

Onboarding

So you’ve done the demo, shown the capabilities of Tableau and your audience is wowed. They want it and they want it NOW! So how do you get them from wanting to having?

Well we didn’t do so well. Our purchasing is handled by another team and the process is fairly complicated. Our mistake was not building a solid enough relationship with the purchasing team early on and making an effort to understand the points of the process that could be improved. We kind of just let them get on with it when we could have offered more assistance. This meant that on occasion users had to wait up to 2 months before they actually got their licence! And sometimes that cost us users, who gave up during the process.

Eventually we got together and helped the purchasing team out. And now things are a lot better. My advice – if you see a team you have a dependency on are struggling, then speak to them and help them out. Sounds obvious, but on this occasion we didn’t.

Setting Expectations

I spend a lot of time talking to users, often at a senior level, asking them to feedback on their experience with Tableau. On the whole it’s great stuff that comes back, but occasionally I used to get surprised with users informing me that their experience was poor. Tableau didn’t do what they wanted, it was inflexible and hard to use.

That didn’t sound like the Tableau I know and love. So I did some more research and it turned out that the users who didn’t like Tableau were trying to get it to do something that it wasn’t designed for. Now that’s fine if you’re Allan Walker or Noah Salvaterra but most of my users aren’t that level – in fact few people are. And of course that meant the users were getting frustrated.

I think the comment that really resonated was “Tableau? That’s Excel online isn’t it?”. Er – NO IT ISN’T!

The problem was obvious. Users thought Tableau was something it wasn’t. And naturally they would get a degraded experience. So we created a document that clearly states what Tableau is good at, and what it isn’t good at. We make users read this doc when they sign up for the service so they know exactly what they are getting.

This was very successful and really cut down the instances of poor feedback.

Some related posts on this subject from Dan Murray, Matt Francis & Peter Gilks

Training from the Get-Go

I’m a self-learner. So is my team, and most of the people I work with. I’m sure you are as well, that’s why you’re here reading this. And as a result I expect others to be the same. And for the self-learner, the world of Tableau is great. Tons of bloggers, forums, help articles, Tweeters, online videos and all sorts of quality learning materials. It really is one of the strengths of Tableau IMHO.

So we created guides & 101 pages etc and told users to go and help themselves. And to be fair, some of them did. But not as many as we’d have liked. And as a result we got tons of newbie questions and consequently poor quality content on our server.

About 8 months into the service we decided to implement a structured, instructor led training programme, amongst other training initiatives. More details here. Much of the syllabus is covered by Tableau’s own online videos and other resources but for some reason, new users really responded to this structured course. As a result we saw a corresponding improvement in the quality of published content and a reduction in the basic level questions to the team. In hindsight we should have implemented this right at the start, rather than assuming everyone would be keen to self-learn.

Commercials

Much as I love Tableau, their commercial operation isn’t the most flexible. That’s not just my opinion, it has been mentioned in Gartner reports. As a result we’ve struggled to negotiate the most competitive packages that we could have done. There have been some valid reasons for that but I don’t think we put as much effort into resolving the related issues as we should have.

And that’s important. I don’t want to get the best price for the sake of it, in big enterprises there are a lot of competitive threats from other tools. If Tableau isn’t competitive with pricing then the people that make the technology decisions will be perfectly happy to rip it out and replace it with something else. Not what anyone wants.

Again much of this is down to relationship building. As our relationship with Tableau has grown, we’ve seen improvement in this area.

Gamification

I’m a big fan of gamification. It can really boost engagement and turn a good initiative into an awesome one. We’ve had a couple of half-hearted stabs at competitions, to try and get things going but there is so much more we can do. Hackathons, viz games, competitions and internal Iron Viz – we’ve got a ton of ideas but never made it happen yet.

I think that’s partially down to the wide geographical spread of my user base. It would be really hard to get people to show up in a particular location. Users are also insanely busy, would I be able to round up enough people to make it worthwhile? So lots of excuses and not a lot of achievement in this area. I’m open to ideas if you’ve got this one nailed.

That’s it for now. There may well be a part 2 to this as I’m sure there are more things that will come to mind as I cry myself to sleep thinking what a mess we’ve made of it all… 🙂

Thanks to the awesome Matt Francis for inspiring this post.

Happy vizzing, VN

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2 Responses to What we got wrong building our Tableau service

  1. Andy Miller says:

    Hi Paul, thanks for your insight as usual – always appreciate the lessons learned regarding COE’s, especially one with the breadth of yours. I wanted to chime in and mention that your point on onboarding and procurement is something we encountered as well. In fact, we still have those issues and your post prompted me to revisit and get more involved. First impressions with the tool are important, so having a smooth purchasing process is critical. As always, thanks for sharing!!!

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