The Three Levels of Tableau Support

Hi all,

Let’s talk a bit more about how to build a top Tableau support team. This post focuses on the support my team provides to our user base. At the moment we have just over 1000 Tableau Desktop users, and approximately 8000 active users on the server every month – that’s a lot of demand for our services.

Now users can be a pretty demanding bunch, with myriad questions, queries and problems. And we are busy. So how do we ensure that users get the level of support they need? Well we provide 3 levels of main support, with the objective being to ensure that the type of user query / issue is directed to a channel that gives it the appropriate level of attention. This ensures an efficient use of my team’s valuable time, and critically it cuts down the traffic to our email inbox which is always a good thing.

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Some of the support options for our users

Level 1 – Man down!

Red alert! Something is busted and it needs to be looked at now! For this we need any incident to be logged in a trouble ticket system, with appropriate priority and detail. We use Service Now for this (many other tools available).

So if users think Tableau is broken or they need some immediate help then they log a ticket. This is mandatory. We need to track and log the progress, and the data is audited regularly. No ticket, no fix. We obviously don’t wait stubbornly for the ticket though, if there’s a big issue we investigate while the incident is logged.

Once the ticket is logged it flows through our regular support flow. First my Level 1 team will take a look and see if there’s an easy fix. If they can’t fix it then it’s an escalation to my more skilled Level 2 team, and then a potential escalation to my main Level 3 team for the trickier issues. There may be a future post coming about effective incident management, so I won’t go into detail here.

Some users don’t like us mandating that they raise an incident ticket. But it’s the only way to ensure traceability of problems.

Level 2 – It can wait

Sometimes users have problems or requests for assistance that are not so time sensitive. Maybe a development dashboard has broken, or someone needs help from the team to perfect that Pareto chart, or hey – maybe they just wanna talk about how much they love Tableau (it happens!)?

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Book your appointment with a Tableau Dr.

That’s where a Tableau Dr. Session is needed. We dedicate 3 half days a week to Tableau Dr. Sessions. Users log onto our community page and can book their session from a list of available slots. If the next slot is in a couple of days then they have to wait to be seen. Providing this structure to the sessions is critical as it allows my team to keep control. Before we implemented the structured sessions we were getting peppered with do-it-now requests for Dr. Sessions. That meant my team was context switching all over the place and other projects were being impacted.

Providing structure also makes users understand this is a finite resource and thus they are more appreciative of this dedicated time with my Tableau experts.

 

Level 3 – Let’s talk about Tableau, baby

Next level of support is for general chat. Could be a question about functionality, or a point about performance, or a geeky joke, or someone just wanting to ask a question about our upgrade strategy – could be anything really.

 

That’s where our Lync Group Chat comes in. We’ve generally got a couple of hundred users on the chat channel at any one time so it’s a decent forum for such questions and banter. It’s great for my support team to see a question get asked, and then before we have a chance to pick it up, another user has provided the answer – a self healing community – IT support nirvana!

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Wanna chat Tableau? Use our Group Chat

 

What’s in it for me?

These support options ensure that each query gets an appropriate response. If it has all hit the fan, then we act quickly. If it needs more care and detail, then we book that time, and if it just needs someone to talk to then we’ve got a community of people ready to give that data hug. It also means we get hardly any emails. And email is a dreadful means of logging an issue, as there’s no traceability or feedback. Users only get annoyed when they feel a query is being ignored, and ensuring the correct channel for a query means users get feedback as appropriate and aren’t left wondering where that email question went to.

Also my support team can plan their work and aren’t constantly context switching, one of the biggest enemies of productivity.

So that’s it. Pretty simple to implement but mightily effective. As always, ping me if you want a more detailed run-through.

Happy vizzing, Paul

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Tableau on Tour Keynote Speakers – Some Suggestions

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This gallery contains 32 photos.

Hi all, I love the Tableau Conference. But I also have a lot of fun at the smaller “Tableau On Tour” events. In particular I love the keynote speeches. We’ve had some crackers recently, with particular recent favourites being Tim … Continue reading

Empowering Your Tableau Users With Makeovers & Proactive Support

Hi all,

More on building that dream Tableau Centre of Excellence function. I’ve previously posted about how to structure your support team and ways to build user engagement with “Tableau Champions”, this post focuses on how you can use Tableau’s introspection capabilities to deliver a more proactive support function.

What is proactivity?

The traditional definition of proactive is as follows.  To me it means means seeing into the future and Screen Shot 2016-08-07 at 21.21.00getting to an issue before it even happens. In the world of IT Support, proactivity really is the Holy Grail, meaning the difference between a good support function and an amazing one. But it’s super-hard to achieve, especially in the complex enterprise level setups that have multiple break points. You can almost never prevent something from breaking, no matter how good your monitoring is.

What you can do is add some proactivity into the way your team operates by identifying when your users are not getting the best from your service. In Tableau Server world we have the ability to spot the following and much more.

  • Slow Tableau visualisations
  • Consistently failing extracts
  • Stale content

I won’t go into how to achieve this, it’s the subject of a future post. But I’ll point you in the direction of these 2 posts that should get you on the way. Go check out Custom Admin Views by Mark Jackson and Why are my Extracts Failing – by Matt Francis.

I get my team to scan our admin views, to identify those users that in our opinion are not getting the best experience they can from Tableau. If we see someone who might be experiencing consistently slow visualisations, or have regularly failing extracts then we give them a call. Often the users won’t even have a complaint. But our message is “We think you’re not getting the best experience possible, and we want to make that happen”.

screen-shot-2016-11-17-at-21-17-13The initial reaction is often surprise. “I’m ok, I didn’t raise an issue” will be a common response. But then once we’ve worked with the user, and improved their experience, you’ll find they are blown away. You may even get a call from their management!

You’ll find this kind of service is very rare in most organisations so if you can deliver it, even sporadically, then you’ll be regarded very highly.

Makeovers

This is pretty simple, if a little time-consuming. Browse the Tableau content on your server. Spot something that doesn’t look great – it might be slow, not compliant with your best practices, or just fugly. Download that content, and give it a makeover. Make it look great, maybe add some improved functionality, make it nail best practices.

This is one of my team’s favourite activities due to the reaction of the user / client. They LOVE it. It really creates a sense of engagement, the user feels that your team actually really cares about them. We’ve also had our Tableau Champions participate in Makeovers which is even better as it saves my team some cycles.

Be careful though, some user content might be confidential and the user may not appreciate an admin poking around in their data. Also, remember that by doing this you are implying a criticism of their work, so handle the communication with care and sensitivity.

Also ensure that you don’t just change stuff and then drop it back on their laps. In a self-serve model like mine users develop and support their own content so it is crucial the user knows what you’ve changed, how you’ve changed it and what benefits you feel the modification brings. Pull them and their manager into a call, run through what you’ve done and then hand it back over to them to run with it.

These have been very successful in my organisation. Users truly appreciate the help and my team has fun doing it.

So there you are, a couple of tips for adding that gloss to your Tableau support service.

Cheers, Paul

Building user engagement with Tableau Champions

Hi all,

More on building an enterprise Tableau Centre of Excellence. That’s pretty much all I know about hence why I seem to be writing about it a lot…

This is a short post about an initiative that is proving to be pretty successful at my organisation, we call it Tableau Champions.

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We are the Champions!

We’ve based this loosely on Tableau’s own Zen Master initiative. For those that don’t know, Zen Master is effectively a title awarded to members of the community on a yearly basis. For more information see here – http://www.tableau.com/ZenMasters

 

What makes a Tableau Champion?

We award the Champions badge to users that demonstrate

  • Passion & enthusiasm for Tableau & data visualisation
  • Support of the Agile BI service at my organisation
  • Skils in Tableau & visual analytics
  • Willingness to share & assist other Tableau users
  • Involvement in the Agile BI community

Even amongst a huge user base like I have, it is easy to spot users that demonstrate these characteristics. They will become your trusted advisors, providing great feedback and helping you iron out the bumps in your service.

 

What’s in it for a Champion?

Here’s what my team does to help Champions

  • Build Tableau skills & contacts
  • Increase internal profile across the org & gain stature as a Tableau SME
  • Increase external profile
  • Exposure to extra product information & roadmaps
  • Contribution to the development of the Agile BI service
  • Great collaboration opportunities across the firm

 

 What’s in it for my service?

And in return Champions help us by

  • Makeovers & dissemination of Best Practices
  • Publicising events & webinars
  • Blogging on Agile BI community site
  • Host local user groups
  • Champions help local users evolve Tableau skills
  • Driving better understanding of visual analytics & Tableau

 

So it’s a mutually beneficial scheme, with Champions effectively acting as an extension on my own team. Win and indeed – win.

One thing I noticed was the way the Champions initiative immediately started to raise the bar in terms of user interaction with Tableau at my org. No sooner had I posted the first blog announcing our initial Champions, then I had multiple emails from other users saying “I want to be a Champion”, “What do I need to do to get this recognition?”. I could even tell that some users were a little miffed not to have been selected. I then saw these users upping their game, posting more, interacting more, trying to be noticed. We’ve seen this with the Zen Master scheme eliciting exactly this kind of response from the external community.

So there you have it. We love to empower our users. And we love to reward those users that have become hooked on Tableau like we have.

Cheers, Paul

Shapes, Icons and Flags for your Tableau viz

Top Tips

Hi all,

Simple one this. A list of some resources that might be useful for supplementing your Tableau vizzes.

I keep finding myself going to these resources time after time. Feel free to suggest other go-to sites for your vizzes.

Icons

  • Screen Shot 2014-10-20 at 13.27.33FlatIcon – Loads of free icons. Multiple formats & sizes. I love the sketched nature of a lot of these. Minimal and neat but with a lot of character.
  • BrainyIcons – Similar stuff here. Cool hand-drawn style looks great.

Flags

  • Screen Shot 2014-10-20 at 13.25.53FreeFlagIcons – Wide variety of shapes for all your national flag requirements. Very neat and professional looking and a wide variety of shapes and styles . Ideal for any viz requiring custom flag shapes.

Maps

  • Tableaumapping.bi – Want gesopatial data for your maps? Allan Walker Screen Shot 2014-10-20 at 13.28.58
    (@allanwalkerit) & Craig Bloodworth (@craigbloodworth) have you covered in this excellent resource. If you don’t see what you need here then ping them on Twitter – what they don’t know about maps aint worth knowing.
  • ColorBrewer – Get that map colour scheme looking just right with this tool

Review Services

  • HelpMeViz – Get some constructive advice on that viz from @helpmeviz.

That’s it. Hope these prove useful.