Quizzical Vizzical

makingof

Let’s get vizzical, vizzical! I wanna get vizzical! I think that’s how the song goes anyway.

logo_optaSome of you may know a company called Opta. They’re the leading provider of sport data in Britain and provide feeds to just about everyone, including major broadcasters, sporting clubs and governing bodies. What they don’t know about data isn’t worth knowing.

optaquizAnyway, I know what goes on there as my brother Simon is their Director of Marketing. And one of their main industry events is a twice a year football quiz event where they invite all the big players from media, online, broadcast and other experts to get together and battle it out. The questions are ultra-fiendish and the competition fiercely fought. It’s a very popular event.

So my task was to viz up the results from the last quiz and see if we can infer some trends and have a bit of fun.

And here it is. The 4th OptaJoe Football Quiz results viz.

optaviz

So how’d I do this?

1. Data

For a change this was the easy bit! A spreadsheet of questions, teams and the scores for each team. I used a very simple Alteryx module to transpose the data into the correct format, but that was a 2 minute job.

That gave me a data structure like this. Perfect for Tableau.

datasheet

2. Viz design

This was the hard bit. I needed this to be clear, accurate and look smart. Opta plan on using this viz as part of the promotional material for their next quiz so it needed to be spot on.

Top Panel – I usually put the focus of the viz in this area. And the focus is obviously the result. I used one of my favourite views, the dual axis bar chart with shape terminator to show the results.

Bottom Left – I wanted to show how the standings were fluctuating as the rounds went on. For example, did Sky Sports run away with it, or did the lead change hands multiple times? Who finished strongly and who faded at the finish line? Did that with a simple line chart. Not so effective with all the teams selected but as with many views, very effective when only a subset is selected.

Bottom Right – Now I love this view. This is a matrix using the rank calculation to show how each team ranked per round. It works great with the colour coding and allows you to easily see the teams that were constantly good or bad. It also adds an element of colour to the viz.

rankTake The Guardian for example, who clearly would have won the quiz but for a terrible round midway though the event where they ranked 17th.

You can also see how some teams actually won a couple of rounds, like the Mirror, but also had some shockers that cost them a decent overall finish.

Font – Now Opta have a very well defined brand identity, and part of that brand is the typeface they use. I managed to identify it as “Chalet Paris NineteenSeventy“, which was as close as I could get to their font. I managed to download this font and install, which allowed me to select it as one of the usable fonts in Tableau. Unfortunately I got inconsistent behaviour when publishing to Tableau Public so the end result isnt as good as I would have liked. Any report consumer would also have to have that font installed to get the full effect.

You can go grab the font from here if you want.

Filtering – The chosen filtering was determined by the intended use of this viz. For example, this viz is likely to be shared amongst the teams to generate banter and a bit of a laugh at how well / badly one team has performed against one of their industry rivals. So I decided to group up the teams by industry sector, to allow a direct comparison within a couple of clicks.

filteredviz

Take this example of the viz filtered to show just the TV companies taking place. You can see the final outcome, round by round progress and comparative rankings per round. It’s even better when you clear the round selector and iterate through the rounds, effectively replaying the quiz from the start. Very cool.

So there you have it. I’m well pleased with this one. I’ve never tried to vizualise quiz results before and I think this format works well. It’s a good example of the viz design being heavily influenced by the audience and what I imagined they’d do with the viz in terms of generating banter, chat and competition in the pub.

For more information on the OptaJoe Football Quiz, here’s their live blog from the event. And here’s some more info on the participants.

Oh and if you think you can do better than some of the teams then here are the questions. Good luck!

Questions 1st half

Questions 2nd half

Regards, Paul

FIFA Ballon d’Or 2013 Dashboard

makingof

Hello there everyone!

Thanks to everyone for the great feedback on my recent Pinball viz. Was a lot of fun doing it, and glad it brought back some youthful memories for a number of people. I wasn’t intending to produce another viz so soon, but this one is fairly timely.

See I love football. I mean LOVE it. For some reason I’m still playing every week in the Surrey Sunday leagues, my 21st season. The old bones creak a bit these days and I’m not as quick as I once was, but the enjoyment is still there. So like many I watched with interest as the recent World Footballer of the Year awards were announced. Sorry I’d better say the FIFA World Footballer of the Year awards in case Mr Blatter is watching.

The actual results weren’t too much of a surprise. Ronaldo, Messi & Ribery making up the top 3. But I wanted to see how those votes broke down and see if I could pull out any trends using Tableau. Especially as there has been much chat about whether these votes are a bit of a farce or otherwise.

And here it is!

dordash

A viz of all the votes, showing geographical distribution, points breakdown per player and voter type (coach, captain or media).

So how did I do this?

1. Data

Data was pretty easy to get hold of. In a rare display of process transparency FIFA publish it here. Each voter names their top 3 players from a short list with 5 points given for first place, 3 for second and one point for third. Total points wins the trophy. Simple.

dordataWell sort of simple. See this format has the player name as a measure, I want it as a dimension. Copying this data into Excel for analysis wasn’t a goer, it just didn’t seem to be manageable with Tableau in that format.

reshaperSo this gave me the chance to try out this Excel Tableau “data reshaper”. I’ve heard other people talk about it but never used it myself. Simple enough to install and bingo – worked first time.

formatteddataMy data now looked like this, with the player name as a dimension. Worked fine when connected to Tableau. Perfect.

2. Viz design

I really wanted this viz to show the following

  • Geographical distribution of votes
  • Is there a trend of votes between the 3 voter types
  • Any oddities in voting?

With that I made the focus of the viz a map with pies. Now I know this looks a bit cluttered when all the marks are visible, but it does seem to work when the set is restricted with filters or even highlights.

The player filter allows me to easily see where each player’s points came from. The points calculation was done with a simple calculated field to assign either 5, 3 or 1 point to each player’s SUM(Number of Records).

I like highlight tables so I thought I’d provide a full points breakdown. This is more interesting when combined with a filter.

Regarding the regional grouping, that was manually done. Could have split it into ‘official’ FIFA regions I suppose but didn’t have time.

3. The Finished Product

FIFA Ballon d’Or 2013 Dashboard

dordash

What’s this telling me?

There are a few interesting trends that this viz allows me to infer.

mediaFirst off, although Ronaldo won the award, you can see that he got a large portion of his votes from captains and coaches. When I select media as the filter then you can see that Ribery easily won the vote of media representatives, except in the Americas region – kind of expected given that Messi is Argentinian. That’s an interesting finding as FIFA controversially extended the voting deadline to allow Ronaldo’s awesome performance against Sweden to be considered, a move that many felt cost Ribery the award. Ronaldo only topped the vote for one region, Europe.

It’s also easy to see that there was a lot of national favouritism. I.e. assigning points to the player of your own nationality even thought they are clearly not one of the favourites. Examples include – Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Gareth Bale, Yaya Toure, Radamel Falcao, Andrea Pirlo, Robert Lewandowski & Luis Suarez – all of whom received significant points from their home nations.

persie

Lotta love for Robin van Persie in the Carribean (see left).

It was also interesting to see that neither Ronaldo nor Messi voted each other in their top 3. Understandable I suppose, if a little childish.

I can also see a surprising amount of countries that didn’t bother to send in all their votes. I’m looking at YOU Turkmenistan.

So this voting does seem a little contrived and a bit like the Eurovision Song Contest at times. Clear favouritism & agendas at play.

Ok that’s it. As always feedback appreciated. And I know it’s not perfect, so don’t take it too seriously.

“FIFA – For the game. For the world.” – Yeah whatever Sepp.

Regards, Paul