The Three Levels of Tableau Support

Hi all,

Let’s talk a bit more about how to build a top Tableau support team. This post focuses on the support my team provides to our user base. At the moment we have just over 1000 Tableau Desktop users, and approximately 8000 active users on the server every month – that’s a lot of demand for our services.

Now users can be a pretty demanding bunch, with myriad questions, queries and problems. And we are busy. So how do we ensure that users get the level of support they need? Well we provide 3 levels of main support, with the objective being to ensure that the type of user query / issue is directed to a channel that gives it the appropriate level of attention. This ensures an efficient use of my team’s valuable time, and critically it cuts down the traffic to our email inbox which is always a good thing.

screen-shot-2016-11-22-at-14-45-32

Some of the support options for our users

Level 1 – Man down!

Red alert! Something is busted and it needs to be looked at now! For this we need any incident to be logged in a trouble ticket system, with appropriate priority and detail. We use Service Now for this (many other tools available).

So if users think Tableau is broken or they need some immediate help then they log a ticket. This is mandatory. We need to track and log the progress, and the data is audited regularly. No ticket, no fix. We obviously don’t wait stubbornly for the ticket though, if there’s a big issue we investigate while the incident is logged.

Once the ticket is logged it flows through our regular support flow. First my Level 1 team will take a look and see if there’s an easy fix. If they can’t fix it then it’s an escalation to my more skilled Level 2 team, and then a potential escalation to my main Level 3 team for the trickier issues. There may be a future post coming about effective incident management, so I won’t go into detail here.

Some users don’t like us mandating that they raise an incident ticket. But it’s the only way to ensure traceability of problems.

Level 2 – It can wait

Sometimes users have problems or requests for assistance that are not so time sensitive. Maybe a development dashboard has broken, or someone needs help from the team to perfect that Pareto chart, or hey – maybe they just wanna talk about how much they love Tableau (it happens!)?

screen-shot-2016-11-22-at-14-48-33

Book your appointment with a Tableau Dr.

That’s where a Tableau Dr. Session is needed. We dedicate 3 half days a week to Tableau Dr. Sessions. Users log onto our community page and can book their session from a list of available slots. If the next slot is in a couple of days then they have to wait to be seen. Providing this structure to the sessions is critical as it allows my team to keep control. Before we implemented the structured sessions we were getting peppered with do-it-now requests for Dr. Sessions. That meant my team was context switching all over the place and other projects were being impacted.

Providing structure also makes users understand this is a finite resource and thus they are more appreciative of this dedicated time with my Tableau experts.

 

Level 3 – Let’s talk about Tableau, baby

Next level of support is for general chat. Could be a question about functionality, or a point about performance, or a geeky joke, or someone just wanting to ask a question about our upgrade strategy – could be anything really.

 

That’s where our Lync Group Chat comes in. We’ve generally got a couple of hundred users on the chat channel at any one time so it’s a decent forum for such questions and banter. It’s great for my support team to see a question get asked, and then before we have a chance to pick it up, another user has provided the answer – a self healing community – IT support nirvana!

screen-shot-2016-11-22-at-14-45-08

Wanna chat Tableau? Use our Group Chat

 

What’s in it for me?

These support options ensure that each query gets an appropriate response. If it has all hit the fan, then we act quickly. If it needs more care and detail, then we book that time, and if it just needs someone to talk to then we’ve got a community of people ready to give that data hug. It also means we get hardly any emails. And email is a dreadful means of logging an issue, as there’s no traceability or feedback. Users only get annoyed when they feel a query is being ignored, and ensuring the correct channel for a query means users get feedback as appropriate and aren’t left wondering where that email question went to.

Also my support team can plan their work and aren’t constantly context switching, one of the biggest enemies of productivity.

So that’s it. Pretty simple to implement but mightily effective. As always, ping me if you want a more detailed run-through.

Happy vizzing, Paul

Advertisements

Tableau on Tour Keynote Speakers – Some Suggestions

Gallery

This gallery contains 32 photos.

Hi all, I love the Tableau Conference. But I also have a lot of fun at the smaller “Tableau On Tour” events. In particular I love the keynote speeches. We’ve had some crackers recently, with particular recent favourites being Tim … Continue reading

Empowering Your Tableau Users With Makeovers & Proactive Support

Hi all,

More on building that dream Tableau Centre of Excellence function. I’ve previously posted about how to structure your support team and ways to build user engagement with “Tableau Champions”, this post focuses on how you can use Tableau’s introspection capabilities to deliver a more proactive support function.

What is proactivity?

The traditional definition of proactive is as follows.  To me it means means seeing into the future and Screen Shot 2016-08-07 at 21.21.00getting to an issue before it even happens. In the world of IT Support, proactivity really is the Holy Grail, meaning the difference between a good support function and an amazing one. But it’s super-hard to achieve, especially in the complex enterprise level setups that have multiple break points. You can almost never prevent something from breaking, no matter how good your monitoring is.

What you can do is add some proactivity into the way your team operates by identifying when your users are not getting the best from your service. In Tableau Server world we have the ability to spot the following and much more.

  • Slow Tableau visualisations
  • Consistently failing extracts
  • Stale content

I won’t go into how to achieve this, it’s the subject of a future post. But I’ll point you in the direction of these 2 posts that should get you on the way. Go check out Custom Admin Views by Mark Jackson and Why are my Extracts Failing – by Matt Francis.

I get my team to scan our admin views, to identify those users that in our opinion are not getting the best experience they can from Tableau. If we see someone who might be experiencing consistently slow visualisations, or have regularly failing extracts then we give them a call. Often the users won’t even have a complaint. But our message is “We think you’re not getting the best experience possible, and we want to make that happen”.

screen-shot-2016-11-17-at-21-17-13The initial reaction is often surprise. “I’m ok, I didn’t raise an issue” will be a common response. But then once we’ve worked with the user, and improved their experience, you’ll find they are blown away. You may even get a call from their management!

You’ll find this kind of service is very rare in most organisations so if you can deliver it, even sporadically, then you’ll be regarded very highly.

Makeovers

This is pretty simple, if a little time-consuming. Browse the Tableau content on your server. Spot something that doesn’t look great – it might be slow, not compliant with your best practices, or just fugly. Download that content, and give it a makeover. Make it look great, maybe add some improved functionality, make it nail best practices.

This is one of my team’s favourite activities due to the reaction of the user / client. They LOVE it. It really creates a sense of engagement, the user feels that your team actually really cares about them. We’ve also had our Tableau Champions participate in Makeovers which is even better as it saves my team some cycles.

Be careful though, some user content might be confidential and the user may not appreciate an admin poking around in their data. Also, remember that by doing this you are implying a criticism of their work, so handle the communication with care and sensitivity.

Also ensure that you don’t just change stuff and then drop it back on their laps. In a self-serve model like mine users develop and support their own content so it is crucial the user knows what you’ve changed, how you’ve changed it and what benefits you feel the modification brings. Pull them and their manager into a call, run through what you’ve done and then hand it back over to them to run with it.

These have been very successful in my organisation. Users truly appreciate the help and my team has fun doing it.

So there you are, a couple of tips for adding that gloss to your Tableau support service.

Cheers, Paul

Building user engagement with Tableau Champions

Hi all,

More on building an enterprise Tableau Centre of Excellence. That’s pretty much all I know about hence why I seem to be writing about it a lot…

This is a short post about an initiative that is proving to be pretty successful at my organisation, we call it Tableau Champions.

images

We are the Champions!

We’ve based this loosely on Tableau’s own Zen Master initiative. For those that don’t know, Zen Master is effectively a title awarded to members of the community on a yearly basis. For more information see here – http://www.tableau.com/ZenMasters

 

What makes a Tableau Champion?

We award the Champions badge to users that demonstrate

  • Passion & enthusiasm for Tableau & data visualisation
  • Support of the Agile BI service at my organisation
  • Skils in Tableau & visual analytics
  • Willingness to share & assist other Tableau users
  • Involvement in the Agile BI community

Even amongst a huge user base like I have, it is easy to spot users that demonstrate these characteristics. They will become your trusted advisors, providing great feedback and helping you iron out the bumps in your service.

 

What’s in it for a Champion?

Here’s what my team does to help Champions

  • Build Tableau skills & contacts
  • Increase internal profile across the org & gain stature as a Tableau SME
  • Increase external profile
  • Exposure to extra product information & roadmaps
  • Contribution to the development of the Agile BI service
  • Great collaboration opportunities across the firm

 

 What’s in it for my service?

And in return Champions help us by

  • Makeovers & dissemination of Best Practices
  • Publicising events & webinars
  • Blogging on Agile BI community site
  • Host local user groups
  • Champions help local users evolve Tableau skills
  • Driving better understanding of visual analytics & Tableau

 

So it’s a mutually beneficial scheme, with Champions effectively acting as an extension on my own team. Win and indeed – win.

One thing I noticed was the way the Champions initiative immediately started to raise the bar in terms of user interaction with Tableau at my org. No sooner had I posted the first blog announcing our initial Champions, then I had multiple emails from other users saying “I want to be a Champion”, “What do I need to do to get this recognition?”. I could even tell that some users were a little miffed not to have been selected. I then saw these users upping their game, posting more, interacting more, trying to be noticed. We’ve seen this with the Zen Master scheme eliciting exactly this kind of response from the external community.

So there you have it. We love to empower our users. And we love to reward those users that have become hooked on Tableau like we have.

Cheers, Paul

10 Thoughts from Tableau Conference 2015

Howdy y’all,

What a setting..

What a setting..

Yeah it’s 2am and I’m wide awake. Coming down from a great week at Tableau Conference 2015 in Las Vegas. So I thought I’d knock up a post about how the week was for me.

 

 

Thought #1 – “WTF?!”

Er...

Er…

Turning up for registration on the Sunday, the last thing I expected to see was an 8 foot high poster of my ugly mug grinning out at me. I saw some younger children at the event and they would surely have nightmares at such an image. Then there’s the question of my image rights… Tableau we need to talk about that…

Although it did allow people to get their #picwiththepauls

Francois gets his #picwiththepauls

Francois gets his #picwiththepauls

 

Thought #2 – “Wow it’s so great to meet you at last / again”

TC is all about the people. It was great to meet people that I’ve been interacting with all year. Some of these were existing relationships, and others were meeting for the first time. Too many to name but I was really pleased to finally meet George Gorczynski, Steve Fenn, Mat Hughes, Jen Vaughan, Fiona Gordon, Jon Boeckenstedt, Ken Black ( & Jett) & Mike Moore.

It’s great when I meet someone that deals with Server rather than all you Desktop jockeys. See us Server folk have a secret handshake and knowing look in our eyes. We know what really matters in Tableau!

It was also great to see the new Zen Masters. Especially the British contingent – my pals Chris Love & Rob Radburn. Awesome stuff.

 

Thought #3 – “The devs smashed it”

I was delighted at the product enhancements announced this year. Functionality that is really going to make a difference to the ~4000 users I support.

It will be interesting to see which features really capture the imagination of my user base, but I can anticipate cross DB joining, union &  global filters being very popular, as well as the user home page on server.

We're not worthy..

We’re not worthy..

But I kinda gave my position away as to what made my day in terms of new functionality – yes that pic does show me bowing down in homage to Version Control. In front of 11000 people. Hey I’m not embarrassed, it took all of my self-control to prevent myself from storming the stage and giving the guy a hug.

 

Thought #4 – “Isn’t technology great”

My conference experience was massively enhanced by a couple of tech items.

Firstly the hugely useful Tableau Conference app. I love the way the organisers monitor the number of favourites a session gets in order to determine of the room allocation is suitable for thee demand.

Secondly, WhatsApp. Despite having a crappy name, this app was great for keeping in touch with colleagues and friends. My pals at The Information Lab are always super-concerned with the social aspect of events and set up a WhatsApp group to allow us to sync. Before we knew it there were 50 members and it became the prime method of determining what bar everyone was in or what session people were at. Great stuff.

 

Thought #5 – “Las Vegas – oh dear me”

download

Fabulous? Erm…

I’ve been to Las Vegas once before. Just for a couple of days passing through. I recall not being too impressed back then, and this visit just confirmed my earlier thoughts. While I’m undoubtedly amazed at the imagination and brilliance of the designers that constructed some of the buildings, I’m still left with a feeling of disgust and depression at the underlying tone of seediness and corruption. It offends pretty much everything that I stand for.

I hope some of you managed to take a virtual shower by getting out to the Grand Canyon or surrounding areas like Bryce Canyon which are stunning. That’s Las Vegas for me. You can keep your Casinos.

 

Thought #6 – “Why can’t we just have one big global time zone?”

Jet lag sucks. I propose we have one mega time zone (GMT of course) and stick to that. The rest of the world would have to work in perpetual darkness but you’d soon get used to it. Change your goddam date format while you’re at it.

 

Thought #7 – “That’s the best session I’ve ever seen at a Tableau Conference”

I hope some of you went to the talk by Jeffrey Shaffer & Andy Kriebel entitled “Dear Data Two“. Read the abstract if you want to know what it was about but suffice to say I found this talk incredibly engaging. It covered a huge variety of data viz examples, all done with fun and humour. It was also technical enough as the vizzes were also constructed in Tableau. I loved it. Original, brilliant and emotional at times, this was everything a TC session should be. And told by two natural presenters on stage.

Another stand-out session was “The New Tableau Web Data Connector: APIs, JSON & Javascript for Dummies” by Craig Bloodworth. This was a perfectly pitched run-through of the WDC and gave me real confidence that I could go and build one myself.

 

Thought #8 – “Nice one @cheeky_chappie”

Safety first at Paul's talk

Safety first at Paul’s talk

I tend to hang around a lot with Paul Chapman. No I don’t know why either, but it happens. And it was great to see him absolutely smash it with his presentation “A Single Shade of Orange“. He’s a #futurezenmaster for sure.

He has been ably coached by an expert road crew (myself & Tom Barber) so we take some (most) of the credit for his success.

 

Thought #9 – “I wish I was on that stage”

I’ve spoken at the last 3 Tableau Conferences (2 in London & also Seattle). My application was rejected this year to rightly give someone else a chance. That’s cool.

But I was super-jealous of those that did get the opportunity. Speaking at a Tableau event isn’t like other events (of which I do a few). At TC you’re presenting in front of friends, and people that share your mission. They want you to do well. No-one is watching you and judging, or hoping you don’t do well. They all want to learn from you and want you to rock.

It’s a mega buzz to be up on stage and I’d recommend anyone to do it, even if you feel you’re not a natural presenter.

 

Thought #10 – “This whole thing isn’t the norm”

Code. That’s all Tableau is. Computer code. So why has it changed my entire working life in less than 3 years? I think I know the answer. You see in order to achieve this perfect storm an organization needs to nail each of the 3 pillars

  • Application – the tool has to rock. It needs to be easy to use and needs to be able to make your job easier, not harder.
  • Company – The company needs to be solid. Progressive, innovative and approachable
  • Community – You need a great set of users, with a true sense of collaboration and friendship.

In my career I’ve seen many tools, companies and communities. Most organisations nail 1 out of the 3, occasionally you’ll get a really good one that hits 2/3 – but in 15 years of IT, Tableau is the only one I’ve seen that nails each of these pillars and then some.

It sounds almost cheesy to say it but this isn’t the norm. If you’re a 20-something graduate in your first job using Tableau and you think that all tools and organisations are like this then you’d better wake right up now. This is NOT the normal experience. I’m just grateful I found it at all, mid-way through my career. If you’re lucky enough to have discovered Tableau in your youth then WELL DONE! Enjoy it! You’ve hit the jackpot!

So those are my thoughts on another stellar event. See you in Texas everyone!

Paul

Thoughts from Tableau Conference 2014

Howdy y’all,

I’m writing this onboard BA48 from Seattle to London after attending my first international Tableau Conference. My mind is still buzzing after such a great week, packed with emotion, knowledge, pride, fear and more.

I’m going to try and make sense of the week by attempting to document my key thoughts and takeaways. Maybe some of them will apply to others, I’m not sure.

Thought #1 – “This must have cost a fortune!”

Right from the off it was apparent that Tableau have chucked a whole load of cash at this event. The conference venue was huge, brilliantly decked out in Tableau colours. Helpful signs were everywhere, as well as tons of eager Tableau employees all dedicated to making sure you got to where you wanted to go. There were refreshments whenever you needed them, tech stations, games and all the requirements you needed to work, rest or play. The keynote arena was phenomenal and created an electric atmosphere.

I loved the keynotes. Brilliantly relevant subject areas, from passionate and engaging speakers. Particular highlights were John Medina & Neil deGrasse Tyson. I imagine that caliber of speaker doesn’t come cheap though!

A fantastic effort and one that really made me feel that this event was critical to the company.

Thought #2 – “What a lot of nice helpful people”

So many Tableau guys and girls around to help us navigate or fix any issues. We were guided into the arenas and shown exactly where we needed to go – it required no effort and no scrutinizing of maps and guides.

I also found great help when setting up for my speaking sessions. Expert tech-checks, and attentive audio-visual assistance got pretty much any problem resolved is super-quick time allowing me to concentrate on my talks.

There was also great help from my assigned Tableau partners for my speaker sessions and other interactions. Big thanks in particular to Morgan and Jewel for helping me out.

Thought #3 – “This App was a good idea”

Messages, updating schedules, announcements and much more, the data14 app was a key companion for the whole week. Also very useful for the organisers as well I imagine, with the favourites function allowing them to gauge potential interest in talks and allocate rooms accordingly. Don’t get me started on that gameon thing though.

Thought #4 – “I wouldn’t mind living in Seattle”

What a nice city. I flew in a couple of days before the conference so had a good look around, including a great tour of the area in a seaplane (flown by @cheeky_chappie(!). Some stunning scenery and a great chilled out vibe. And that’s not even mentioning the greatest music scene ever (I’m a bit of a grunge kid at heart). We also went off to the ball game which was cool.

Thought #5 – “Wow! It’s so great to meet you at last”

I20140911_090609 lost count of how many times I said that. The opportunity to meet and thank members of the Tableau community was my top takeaway from data14. I must have met several dozen people that I’d been regularly interacting with over the last year. I’d be here all day if I mentioned everyone but meeting Ramon Martinez (@hlthanalysis), Mark Jackson (@ugamarkj), Emily Kund (@emily1852) and Kelly Martin (@vizcandykelly), and being able to thank them personally made me feel incredibly happy.

Thought #6 – “I don’t know much about data viz”

Despite learning an absolute TON of new skills at the conference I still left feeling that I’m faced with a mountain to climb. So many insightful, passionate, and clever people. I met many of the Zen Masters also, and was very humbled by their skills and also by their willingness to pass the skills on. In fact my first lunch break featured an impromptu masterclass in data densification from Jonathan Drummey. Superb.

Thought #7 – “I know quite a lot about data viz”

Yes that does contrast with the previous thought doesn’t it. How come? Well if I think about it then several hundred people came to see me speak across my 2 sessions. Lots of people stopped me and asked questions about my blog articles and other presentations etc. In fact I couldn’t go anywhere without being stopped and engaged in some great data conversation.

Then on the final day, a data fan stopped me and told me that my work, blogging and community interactions have helped him to get out of bed every day and do a better job. That was fabulous to hear. If a little surreal.

So I left thinking yes I do have tons to learn and take in, but I’ve also got my own skills that people want to hear about.

Thought #8 – “Everyone should try and get up on stage”

BxMOf9QCEAAzYetI used to be scared about presenting. Not with the Tableau Conference. The community is so strong that it’s like presenting to a group of friends. I was lucky enough to be able to present 2 sessions and both were a great thrill, despite a couple of technical hitches!

So if you think you’ve got a Tableau story to tell then try and get involved. Tableau open the speaker applications early in the year so look out for it. You’ll love it.

Thought #9 – “This whole thing isn’t the norm”

Code. That’s all Tableau is. Computer code. So why has it changed my entire working life in less than 3 years? I think I know the answer. You see in order to achieve this perfect storm an organization needs to nail each of the 3 pillars

  • Application – the tool has to rock. It needs to be easy to use and needs to be able to make your job easier, not harder.
  • Company – The company needs to be solid. Progressive, innovative and approachable
  • Community – You need a great set of users, with a true sense of collaboration and friendship.

In my career I’ve seen many tools, companies and communities. Most organisations nail 1 out of the 3, occasionally you’ll get a really good one that hits 2/3 – but in 15 years of IT, Tableau is the only one I’ve seen that nails each of these pillars and then some.

It sounds almost cheesy to say it but this isn’t the norm. If you’re a 20-something graduate in your first job using Tableau and you think that all tools and organisations are like this then you’d better wake right up now. This is NOT the normal experience. I’m just grateful I found it at all, mid-way through my career. If you’re lucky enough to have discovered Tableau in your youth then WELL DONE! Enjoy it! You’ve hit the jackpot!

So those are my thoughts on data14. I’ve been to dozens of conferences. None have been like this. Many companies don’t sign off on conference attendance as they are often seen as a waste of time. And many are. But Tableau events are better training than any classroom course and I’d say invaluable to anyone that wants to make a career in this fantastic field.

See you in Las Vegas 2015!

Paul